Keeping a Neutral Pelvis – what does that mean?

Keeping a Neutral Pelvis – what does that mean?

In my work, I spend a large part of my time educating or re-educating people about feeling and holding a neutral pelvis.  Whether it’s in asana, bodyweight movements in the gym or Olympic or power lifting movements, the neutral pelvis is a fundamental structural position for healthy movement and a strong stable core.  Although the cue to “tuck your tailbone” makes my hackles go up – it’s a blunt explanation that gets most of you there – one of my BFFs, Amber Karnes from Body Positive Yoga did this blog post awhile back and I loved it for it’s simplicity.  Enjoy!  And, as most of my clients will hear me say before they squat, “Brace!”

 

Here’s a quickie on alignment! We had a question on the Body Positive Yoga Facebook page today about what “keeping the pelvis in a neutral position” means. You probably will hear that in a yoga class and … yeah – what the heck does it mean?! I found this picture online which shows positions for someone riding a horse, but I love the depiction of a “pelvic bucket of water” as it’s a visualization I use myself. 

A pencil drawing of an equestrian rider with the pelvis shown in three positions. The pelvis is illustrated as a bucket of water. First, the lower back is arched with the water spilling forward. Second, the bucket is neutral and the spine retains its natural curves. Third, the pelvis is tucked, the back flattened, and water spills out the back.

To find a neutral pelvic position, think about your pelvis like a bowl of water. Instead of having sassy, Beyoncé-butt, booty-tootch butt where you stick your butt out and arch your low back (spilling the water forward onto your lap), bring the front hip points (hip bones) up and make space in the low back. You can even place your hands like handles on each of your hips (wrap the fingers toward the hip bones and the thumbs toward the sacrum), and move the pelvis around. Try both positions – tucking and tilting until you find neutral.

To find neutral, tuck the tailbone slightly and lift the pubic bone. Don’t tuck your tailbone so much that “water” spills out the back – just let the tailbone be heavy and move toward the heels.

Level the pelvis so your “bowl of water” doesn’t spill. This retains the natural curves in your spine. Make sense?

Stretch Those Hammies! Lisa’s Video Featured on Yoga With Nadine

Stretch Those Hammies! Lisa’s Video Featured on Yoga With Nadine

Check out Lisa’s video on extra back pain relief that was featured on Yoga With Nadine, in her article, Down Dog Problems (solved) Part Two: Stretching Your Hammies.  While it may not seem related, as you know…it’s all related!  And, as Nadine says, “muscles work together in opposing pairs (known rather painfully as agonists and antagonists) so  it’s useful to release front AND back of your hips when you are trying to increase hip mobility. Which is exactly what you are trying to do for a comfy down dog. Also, less back pain? Win.”

Here’s a link to Nadine’s article: Down Dog Problems (Solved) Part Two

86 Year Old Gymnast Has Amazing Skills!

86 Year Old Gymnast Has Amazing Skills!

Meet Johanna Quaas, who holds the Guinness Book of World Records for the Oldest Gymnast in the world! Johanna is proof that strong is sexy at any age and further proof that if you treat your body like the temple that it is, it will return the favor for years to come. No matter what you do for exercise and physical activity just keep doing it! Johanna Quaas does!